The Language of Literature


PART 2Suspense and Surprise
W. H. Auden O What Is That Sound
Who could those soldiers be after?
A C T I V I T Y
With a small group of classmates, write down on a piece of notebook paper a situation—real or imaginary—that your group thinks could be the basis of a story. Include at least one important conflict. For example, your situation might be that of a teenager who wants to be a jockey but is allergic to horses. Then pass your idea to another group. Take the idea that your group receives and agree on a surprise ending to the story. Try to make your solution to the conflict something unexpected, but effective. Jot down your ending at the bottom of the notebook page. With the other groups, take turns reading the story ideas and surprise endings aloud to the whole class and discuss which ones you think are the most intriguing.
Donald Justice Incident in a Rose Garden
The stranger's hand was a little cage of bone.
O. Henry The Gift of the Magi
What is the best gift you can give?

Nikki Giovanni
LITERARY LINK
Luxury
What is your definition of luxury?
Liam O'Flaherty The Sniper
A street fighter meets the enemy.
REAL WORLD LINK
A Respite From 'The Troubles'
Kids of Northern Ireland learn the meaning of 'normal childhood.'
Shirley Jackson The Possibility of Evil
An old woman gets a taste of her own medicine.
Luisa Valenzuela The Censors
Repression can be addictive.
James Thurber The Princess and the Tin Box
What do princesses really want?
Edgar Allan Poe AUTHOR STUDY
Annabel Lee
The Bells
Letter to Maria Clemm
The Cask of Amontillado
A brilliant talent for depicting the dark side of the mind and heart
LITERARY LINK
The Story Behind "The Cask of Amontillado"
 

 


TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF USE
Copyright © 1999 McDougal Littell Inc. All rights reserved.
Trademark Information
Privacy Statement